Cult Association Studies Legion of Christ and Regnum Christi

Article

“By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them”: How Good and Bad Works Can Deceive—the Case of the Legion of Christ

Michael Langone

The cultic studies field includes many cases in which the commendable actions of certain groups incline some observers to view the groups as good. Conversely, the blameworthy actions of certain groups incline some observers to view those groups as bad. Contrary to the well-known biblical saying that gives this panel its title, the situation is often more complex and differentiated than it appears. One cannot necessarily judge a group by its apparent fruits, especially when one is not aware of all the fruits. This panel focused on an illuminating example of a Catholic movement that successfully deceived Church authorities for many years, until the disgraced founder was relieved of his duties by Pope Benedict. The case the panel explored is that of the Legion of Christ, a congregation within the Roman Catholic Church, and its lay sister organization, Regnum Christi. Paul Lennon and Peter Kingsland discussed the “fruits” of these organizations from their respective perspectives as a former Legion priest and a parent of a Regnum Christi member. First, however, a bit of background. The ICSA began to examine the Legion in 2003, when Mexican psychiatrist Cesar Mascarenas gave a talk at our California conference. Somehow, the Legion heard about this talk; and I was approached before, during, and after the conference by people concerned that we were discussing the Legion at a “cult” conference.

We scheduled a follow-up panel on the Legion for our fall conference in Connecticut that same year, inviting as panelists Father James LeBar, Paul Lennon, and Juan Vaca, one of the first ex-Legionaries to accuse the founder of sexual molestation. We also invited the Legion to send representatives to give their side of the controversy. The group invited me to visit their seminary in Connecticut prior to the conference, which I did, along with Father LeBar. Interestingly, the organization sent representatives to our conference for private discussions, but they did not attend the panel.

Our ICSA e-Newsletter published my introduction to the Connecticut panel and later, on July 18, 2006, added an update. You can find that report here.

In that same issue, we also published Paul Lennon’s article, “Aspects of Concern Regarding Legion of Christ Mind Control Reflected in Its Rules, Norms, and Ex-Member Testimonies.”

The current panel was inspired by an interesting email exchange that began when Paul Lennon asked a colleague about Massimo Introvigne’s views on Legion of Christ and Regnum Christi founder Marcial Maciel’s fall from grace. Mr. Introvigne is an attorney who heads an Italian cult-watch organization, CESNUR. Some call him a “cult apologist”; however, he has graciously invited a number of ICSA experts, including me, to speak on issues of harm at CESNUR conferences. He is very much aware of the fact that, as I often put it, some groups harm some people sometimes. However, his concern for religious freedom and his criticisms of some “brainwashing” perspectives have put him on different sides of some issues from most people who attend ICSA conferences. He was to have participated in this panel, but a schedule conflict prevented him from attending.

In the email exchange, Massimo said,

The principle that good fruits are a clue that the tree is good was so widespread that most people in the Church did not believe the accusations against Father Maciel until very late in the pontificate of the Blessed John Paul II. I was among the majority of Catholics and was, of course, wrong. So were the Blessed John Paul II and most cardinals. To his credit, the present Pope was inclined to give some credibility to the accusations against Maciel from the very beginning. But he never questioned the good work of the Legion of Christ and, to this day, is keen to distinguish between Father Maciel’s “criminal activities” and the good work done by the great majority of the Legionaries and by Regnum Christi.

Later in the exchange, he said,

Paul Lennon’s mail confirms that most in the Legion had no idea of what Maciel was doing. This was also true for most OUTSIDE the Legion, who did not know Maciel but did know the good deeds of other Legionaries.

In that same message, Massimo also alluded to something I have noticed as well; namely, that some who disagree with Maciel’s conservative theology suggest that aspects of the theology are wrong because Maciel was corrupt. This is a non sequitur that merely uses Maciel as a hammer to harass theological opponents while it obscures the central issue of harm.

Massimo also shed light on why well-intentioned people can hold diametrically opposite views on an issue. He said that the Renner and Berry book Vows of Silence, which outside the Vatican was generally viewed as vital in exposing Maciel, was, inside the Vatican, viewed as so flawed on matters of Church history and canon law that it “persuaded many in the Vatican that those accusing him [Maciel], since they were obviously wrong in other matters, were probably wrong on Maciel too.” Much of the polarization in the cultic studies field has been fueled by this kind of thinking—the tendency to dismiss people, including people with reputable credentials, because one knows they are wrong about some things. The non sequitur is “If he is wrong about some things, then he must be wrong about all things.”

Thus, members of the so-called anticult movement (ACM) may dismiss so-called procultists because the latter question reports of harm associated with cults, while so-called procultists may dismiss cult critics because they may sometimes report inaccurately about certain groups. This attitude fuels polarization, which encourages inaccuracies to arise on both sides of a controversial issue. In her 1995 presidential address to the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR), Eileen Barker chided her colleagues:

If we are to be honest and self-critical, we have to admit that several of us have reacted against the selective negativity of the ACM by, sometimes quite unconsciously, making our own unbalanced selections. Having been affronted by what have appeared to be gross violations of human rights perpetrated through practices such as deprogramming and the medicalization of belief, there have been occasions when social scientists have withheld information about the movements because they know that this will be taken, possibly out of context, to be used as a justification for such actions. The somewhat paradoxical situation is that the more we feel the NRMs are having untrue bad things said about them, the less inclined we are to publish true “bad” things about the movements. (Barker, 1995, p. 305—emphasis added)

Given this candid remark, it is not surprising that Dr. Barker reached out to ICSA in the late 1990s and established a dialogue that has been quite productive.

Dr. Barker’s remarks to SSSR and the email exchange involving Massimo Introvigne underline the fact that the vast majority of generalizations that refer to human behavior, such as “by their fruits ye shall know them,” are probability statements, not absolute “natural laws.” In the email exchange, I commented,

Given that the tree-fruit relationship, like the cult membership-harm relationship, is only probabilistic and will vary greatly from situation to situation, it seems to me that Church authorities can be faulted, as can some cult experts, for treating the tree-fruit relationship as though it were a “law.” Even if Massimo and Pope Benedict are correct in their belief that “the fruits are, generally speaking, excellent,” we can still fault Church authorities for not adequately examining what they thought were low probabilities. And we can especially fault the Legion’s leaders (not just Maciel) for the viciousness of their attacks on those who dared to criticize Maciel… A grocer may not worry about a handful of eggs broken during a shipment of hundreds of boxes. However, Christians (and anybody else who claims to care about people) ought to be concerned about a handful of broken souls. The pain of one person is not negated by the joy of 100.

In closing, I’d like to comment on the distinction between “good works” or “good deeds” and “good fruits,” a distinction that I did not think about during our email exchanges. Although I am certainly not qualified to expound upon the proper theological interpretation of the biblical verse concerning good fruits, it seems clear to this layman that fruits should not be morally judged without reference to the tree that produces them. In other words, ends should not be morally evaluated without consideration of the means used to achieve them or the context from which they spring.

One may, of course, erroneously believe that a particular tree is good and that the effects seemingly produced by that tree are good fruits. However, if one learns that the tree is not good, even in the imperfect sense in which all “good” people are good, if one learns that the tree is in fact corrupt at its core, then one should refrain from interpreting positive events as necessarily the good fruit of that tree. One should, instead, look for other explanations for the good things formerly associated with the tree now known to be very bad.

The Legion tree was rotten from its inception. No amount of pruning will eliminate the poison in the seed (Marcial Maciel) from which the Legion and Regnum Christi sprouted.

I would, then, humbly suggest to Pope Benedict that he conceive of the Church’s task in this matter to be the preservation of the goodness of individual members of the Legion and Regnum Christi, not the preservation of the organization founded and corrupted by a man whose actions Benedict has called “criminal.” Whatever good fruits we may now point to may be viewed as the fruits of the good will and piety of individuals aspiring to virtue, perhaps in spite of the Legion and Regnum Christi, not because of them.

Dissolve the organizations. Even if property and other considerations argue for some legal continuity, at least change the names of the organizations. Also, move out all of the upper-level management, and some mid-level management, who functioned adaptively for so many years in Maciel’s climate of deceit, control, and abuse. One does not adapt to such a system without internalizing attitudes and habits of thought that sustain the system. The resulting identity does not disappear simply because the leader is gone.

The rank-and-file members of these organizations also adapted themselves to the system, and, like their leaders, they do not shed their Legion/Regnum Christi identities automatically because Maciel was discredited. The universal human tendency to rationalize will preserve Maciel’s influence in ways that will not always be apparent. Church authorities, whose inclinations tend toward kindness and gentleness, may be reluctant to challenge the rank and file. I believe this would be a mistake. The cognitive dissonance, confusion, and sense of betrayal that some Legion/Regnum Christi members may feel should be addressed directly, preferably by professionals trained to help people cope with such transitions. The resilience of former cult members who come to the ICSA for assistance suggests that Legion and Regnum Christi members are probably stronger than some Church authorities may think.

In my opinion, the Church needs to affirm its own integrity by expending the pastoral and counseling resources needed to help the good people of the Legion and Regnum Christi see more clearly that the Church welcomes them, that the Church will find or create places for them, and that their desire to do good and to be good does not depend on organizations nourished by decades of deceit. The “good fruits” of the Legion and Regnum Christi members will not wither on the vine if those individuals are separated from the fraudulent system that took advantage of their noble spiritual aspirations.

Reference

Barker, E. (1995). The scientific study of religion? You must be joking! (presidential address to the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion). Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 34(3), 287–310.

About the Author

Michael D. Langone, PhD, a counseling psychologist, received a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1979. Since 1981 he has been Executive Director of International Cultic Studies Association (ICSA). Dr. Langone has been consulted by several hundred former cult members and/or their families. He was the founder and editor of Cultic Studies Journal, that journal’s successor, Cultic Studies Review, and editor of Recovery from Cults: Help for Victims of Psychological and Spiritual Abuse (an alternate of the Behavioral Science Book Service). He is co-author of Cults: What Parents Should Know and Satanism and Occult-Related Violence: What You Should Know. Currently, Dr. Langone is ICSA Today’s Editor-in-Chief. In 1995, he was honored as the Albert V. Danielsen visiting Scholar at Boston University.

El Problema de los Heraldos del Evangelio (Arautos do Evangelho, Heralds of the Gospel) III parte

REVISTA ISTOÉ (BRASIL)

19/9/2019

LOS HERALDOS DEL ANTICRISTO

Una serie de denuncias de padres y exintegrantes, apoyadas en vídeos que muestran ceremonias agresivas que involucran niñas, colocan en jaque las prácticas de los Heraldos del Evangelio, organización ultraconservadora católica que también es sospechosa de corrupción.

Por André Vargas, Guilherme Novelli y Giulio Ferrari

En nombre de la fe, la secta ultraconservadora católica Heraldos del Evangelio corrompe, agrede, humilla y acosa a sus devotos – en especial a jóvenes adolescentes –, mientras recauda dinero y promueve la idea de que el apocalipsis cristiano está por llegar. Hay hasta denuncias de violación. Poco a poco, esas quejas ganan el conocimiento de la opinión pública, de la justicia y de las autoridades eclesiásticas, rompiendo una red de silencio que dura más de 20 años y alcanza a 78 países, en especial en Brasil. En Estados Unidos, el FBI ya recibió quejas y una investigación está por iniciarse – IstoÉ entró en contacto con el agente federal encargado.

Nacida de una cisión de la también ultraconservadora denominación religiosa brasileña Tradición Familia Propiedad (TFP), los Heraldos del Evangelio surgieron en 1997, asumiendo un carácter más religioso y menos político que sus antecesores. Mientras la TFP levanta banderas contra temas espinosos de la vida contemporánea, como aborto, feminismo, reforma agraria, socialismo, minorías, ciudadanía LGBTQ y multiculturalismo, los Heraldos son una especie de TFP radicalizada, vueltos hacia una visión del mundo limitada por el concepto de lo que llaman “Reino de María”, que surgiría después de un período de grande inestabilidad llamado “bagarre” (del francés, lucha o caos), anunciado en las apariciones de Fátima, en Portugal, en 1917. O sea, mientras el mundo avanza, ellos se preparan para vivir en comunión con Dios en una existencia que mezcla las escenas de “Mad Max” y “El Señor de los Anillos”. Por tanto, instalan a sus devotos en “castillos”, grandes edificios que imitan palacios de estilo gótico que sirven de morada y templo cristiano – cuatro de ellos en los alrededores de Sao Paulo, cobijando a 500 alumnos. Existen escuelas en 16 países.

Ahora, cualquiera puede creer lo que quiera. Es una cuestión de fe – y ella debe ser respetada. El problema son las acusaciones de crímenes perpetrados en los “castillos”, mientras el fin prometido no llega. En 2017, un grupo de 50 madres de víctimas de los Heraldos denunció el grupo a la Fiscalía de Sao Paulo y al Vaticano. La investigación secular sigue en secreto de justicia, así como la religiosa. Pero nuevos casos fueron apareciendo. En una de las denuncias, el fundador, monseñor Joao Clá Días, de 80 años, es acusado de abuso sexual por una exintegrante. Huérfana de madre, una joven canadiense, hoy con 27 años, vino a Brasil a estudiar a los Heraldos. Ella relata en carta que, cuando tenía 12 años, fue abusada por Joao Clá, que tocó sus senos y nalgas y la besó. En 2014, a los 22 años, se consiguió apartar de la congregación. Su hermana mayor, que era su tutora, permaneció. Su denuncia está registrada. De los 46 relatos entregados a las fiscalías y secretarías estatales de educación, cuatro son de abuso sexual. Los otros involucran malos tratos, alienación parental y abuso psicológico. Hubo hasta un registro de suicidio. En junio de 2016, Livia Uchida, de 27 años, se habría tirado de una ventana del cuarto piso del convento de Monte Carmelo, en Caieiras.

Videos obtenidos por IstoÉ muestran a monseñor Clá agrediendo a niñas con bofetadas. En uno de ellos, una adolescente asegurada por los brazos mientas está siendo filmada por adultos, dice: “Tengo que salir”. Son escenas de pura humillación. Es forzada a hacer votos de obediencia, castidad y pobreza. En otro video, se fuerza a una niña a besar los pies del religioso. Son los “ósculos sacrales”, besos sagrados dados por el líder como una forma de obtener gracias por parte de la víctima, sea lo que sea que eso quiera decir. En la ley escrita para una sociedad laica y plural eso es crimen.

Sin compresas (toallas higiénicas)

En Carapicuiba, del Gran Sao Paulo, la dueña de casa Flavia Silva Nascimento, de 42 años, pasó penurias para rescatar a su hija S., hoy de 17 años. Procurados por predicadores de los Heraldos que visitaban la parroquia de San Lucas, la familia, que es católica practicante, vio la oportunidad de colocar a su hija en una buena escuela religiosa. No fue lo que ocurrió. A los 12 años, S. pasó por un proceso de lavado cerebral. En vez de estudiar, tenía que rezar y memorizar los textos de Joao Clá y Plinio Correa de Oliveira (1908-1995), fundador de la TFP. Viviendo bajo una disciplina rígida, inspirada en normas militares, ella no tenía ni siquiera acceso a compresas para menstruación. Ella y sus colegas no recibieron nociones de salud ni orientación sexual. En vez de eso, fueron obligadas a hacer sus “votos” como si fueran religiosas adultas y responsables por sí mismas. Durante las vacaciones familiares en la playa, la adolescente se negó a sacarse la túnica de los Heraldos. Sólo pisó la arena el último día. Estaba con botas.

Alérgica y con crisis de asma, la salud de S. se fue deteriorando. La médica con quien la familia solía atenderse fue la que dio la alerta. La madre decidió rescatar a la hija, incluso contra su voluntad inicialmente, después de asistir un video en que Joao Clá aparece como si estuviese practicando un exorcismo en una joven que está siendo asegurada por los brazos. La niña parece asustada y es abofeteada por el religioso. “La familia entró en crisis”, cuenta la madre, al recordar el proceso de retirada de la hija del yugo de los Heraldos. S. huyó de casa dos veces. Hasta que poco a poco entendió que la vida era mejor del lado de afuera. Antes con buenas notas, percibió que se había quedado atrás, pues no había aprendido ni química, ni física, ni biología, ni historia. Incluso así, todavía viste ropas más conservadoras que su madre y conserva algunos resquicios de disciplina. S. relata que la adoración a Joao Clá llega a niveles extremos. Ella y sus colegas ingirieron agua que, afirman sus superiores, habría sido dejada en un recipiente después de que monseñor se enjuagó. “Tuve problemas emocionales, llegué perturbada, pero hoy estoy mejor. Los Heraldos dicen que uno tiene que sufrir. No creo más en eso”, dice.

“Tuve problemas emocionales. Los Heraldos dicen que uno tiene que sufrir”. S., de 17 años, que volvió a casa después de 3 años de internado donde se enfermó.

Está también el brutal caso de un fiel que fue drogado e internado en una clínica psiquiátrica sin autorización de la familia. Residente en la ciudad de San Carlos, estado de Sao Paulo, Alex Ribeiro de Lima, hoy con 39 años, nos contó frente a las cámaras su desgracia. Tenía 15 años cuando ingresó a la TFP, migrando a los Heraldos justo después, donde actuó como lego. Ya adulto, su función era levantar fondos, misión que lo llevó a Portugal e Italia. Eficiente en el trabajo, besó los pies del monseñor y participó de una ceremonia de “sagrada esclavitud”. Su vida se derrumbó después de 18 años de sumisiones. A los 32 años fue internado a la fuerza en una clínica para drogadictos en Jundiaí (Sao Paulo), después de una crisis de ansiedad. Alex mal se acuerda de ese período, pues quedó bajo una fuerte medicación, sin que su familia tuviese conocimiento. Sólo le dieron el alta después que su hermana descubrió todo y amenazó con llamar a la policía. “Quedé amarrado y tuve mucho miedo. Yo decía que no estaba loco”, cuenta. Alex llora y pide disculpas cuando relata su calvario personal, que terminó en abandono. “Ellos me usaron y me dieron una patada. Sólo quieren controlar a las personas”, dice.

Frente a tantas barbaridades, también aparecieron otros crímenes. Exintegrantes afirman haber visto armas de fuego en algunos castillos. Serían revólveres, pistolas y hasta escopetas. La relación de los artefactos con la actividad religiosa no está aclarada. Tampoco se sabe el origen de las armas. El exheraldo Daniel del Río, de 46 años, cuenta que hubo también contrabando y evasión de divisas. Dinero de donaciones que entraría a Brasil oculto en las ropas de los heraldos al regreso de presentaciones de la orquesta y viajes de recaudación. El dinero serviría para apresurar las licencias de construcción y ampliación de los monasterios, además de “agrados monetarios” para autoridades civiles y religiosas. ExTFP, Del Río fue de los Heraldos por seis años y salió en 2002. “Quiero derrumbar a esa organización”, dijo en audio enviado desde España, donde volvió a vivir.

¿Culpa de la víctima?

En medio de la investigación de este reportaje, hubo una tentativa de censura previa. Abogados de la entidad interpusieron un “pedido de tutela anticipada” para impedir cualquier publicación sin oírlos – lo que fue denegado por la justicia. Procurados por ISTOÉ, la entidad sólo se manifestó por medio de sus representantes legales y por escrito.

Sobre las acusaciones de malos tratos, exigen pruebas y responden con represalias legales. Los videos están ahí. Ellos argumentan que nadie fue agredido y que las imágenes fueron captadas de “manera ilícita” y en “contexto de piedad privada, en el ámbito de inmemoriales prácticas litúrgicas de la Iglesia Católica”. También dicen que las alumnas pidieron tal procedimiento. O sea, cargan la responsabilidad a las víctimas. La argumentación de los abogados podría hasta ser usada por radicales musulmanes para justificar el apedreamiento de mujeres hasta la muerte. Cuando les preguntamos sobre eventuales castigos a los involucrados, alegan que “la autoridad competente para evaluar ese tema es la eclesiásticas”. Se consideran víctimas de persecución religiosa de una minoría de descontentos. Puro cinismo. Pegar a un niño es crimen en Brasil, así como abusar sexualmente, maltratar e impedir el convivio con los padres. El día que los Heraldos se purifiquen de las máculas de sus integrantes, lo que sobra será mero conservadurismo.

Asiste a los vídeos

Testimonio de Alex Ribeiro, exheraldo que fue internado a la fuerza en una clínica psiquiátrica des pues de sufrir una crisis.

Joao Clá abofetea niñas en nombre de la fe. La agresión ocurre al minuto 1:08.

Heraldos del Evangelio: otro grupo católico Raro/Sectario/Danyino -II

Fundador y superior general de los Heraldos, Mons. Joao Scognamiglio Clá Dias. Foto: Heraldos del Evangelio

Esta es la segunda publicación de ReGAIN acerca de este grupo que, a pesar de cierta vigiliancia del Vaticano, sigue extendiéndose por el mundo católico.

Pedimos al Cardenal brasilenyo, Braz de Aviz, que intervenga con más vigor a este grupo brasilenyo y corte la mala hierba.

Artículo reciente de un grupo monitor

Artículo reciente del psicólogo espanyol, Miguel Perlado, experto en sectas

En 2017:

Renuncia el Superior General de los Heraldos del Evangelio

12 jun. 2017 – El fundador y Superior General de los Heraldos del Evangelio, Mons. João Scognamiglio Clá Dias, renunció a su cargo el pasado 2 de junio.

La noticia oficial de los Heraldos, recogida por ACIPRENSA, no dice la razón verdadera de la renuncia; que bien podría ser porque el grupo fue intervenido por el Vaticano y se le pidió al Fundador y Superior General renunciar a su puesto para no interferir en la investigación. Recuerden el caso del fundador de los Legionarios de Cristo a quien se le pidió lo mismo en el 2006. En estos casos el Vaticano procede con mucha diplomacia y “tacto cuando hace renunciar a una persona importante…

Another Legion of Christ being accused of sexual abuse of a minor: flawed training and lack of ethics?

Collège-Lycée de l’Immaculée Conception
High school in Méry-sur-Marne, France
Address: 48 Grande Rue, 77730 Méry-sur-Marne, France

ReGAIN has just learned from two reliable sources that a young man has brought sexual abuse charges against another Legionary of Christ. It seems that the offense took place at the Legion’s Apostolic School in France about ten years ago. Details are still sketchy. We can state that the accusation is presently being reviewed in French civil court to see if it meets the requirement to open a case ; the alleged perpetrator would be a Legion consecrated religious who at the time was a teacher/superior at the infamous junior seminary.

There is a referral in the French language WIKIPEDIA to two Legionaries previously being convicted of sexual assault at the school in the same time frame.

WIKIPEDIA

“exactions récentes contre des mineurs

Deux frères légionnaires du Christ de l’école apostolique de Méry-sur-Marne (diocèse de Meaux) tenue par la congrégation sont accusés en 2004 et 2005 d’avoir commis des attouchements sur huit adolescents. L’un d’eux est en fuite. Ils ont été jugés à Meaux et le substitut du procureur a requis deux ans de prison contre le frère E. deux ans de prison avec mandat contre le frère T. F., de nationalité mexicaine, enfui au Mexique. Délibéré le 2 mai 2013 . le frère E. a été condamné à deux ans de prison avec sursis, mise à l’épreuve et soins psychologiques, et 10 000 euros de dommages et intérêts. Le frère T. a été condamné à deux ans de prison ferme avec mandat d’arrêt, et près de 12 000 euros de dommages et intérêts. Les deux hommes ont été inscrits au FIJAIS (Fichier judiciaire automatisé des auteurs d’infractions sexuelles ou violentes) .”

Putting the pieces together: this member of the Legion of Christ religious congregation (with religious vow), then a seminarian in training, is being accused of sexually abusing a minor under his pastoral care. Brother X would then have continued his “training” (Remember Fr. Maciel’s ghost-(Gonzalo Miranda LC?) written bestseller, The Integral Formation of the Priest! ), and was later ordained to the Catholic priesthood in the Legion. One source affirms that after ordination, now Fr. X was sent back to the same junior seminary (students are High School age) to continue teaching or as a formator. A few years ago, Fr. X left -or was asked to leave- the LC and transitioned to the diocesan priesthood where he continued to minister to Catholic families. Another case of the Legion of Christ unloading a problematic priest on an unsuspecting bishop?

ReGAIN’s criticism points, not so much to this individual accused of sexual abuse of a minor, but to the lack of responsibility = Ethics of Legion superiors and leadership cadre. The case opens a Pandora’s box of questions:

What outreach to victims?

What spiritual guidance, pastoral counseling, compensation offered to victims?

What psychological and pastoral help to the offender? Pastoral care, psychological treatment by trained therapists – not by in-home personnel ?

What steps to prevent recurrence? Just ignore the problem, pass it on, get rid of him, unload him on a diocese?

Information is hard to come by; perhaps the French court has put a gag order in place to prevent the victim’s name being made public and/or the whole case may be gagged while investigations are underway.

Let’s see how effective is the Legion of Christ’s damage control.